IT Pro – UK businesses failing basic security measures

itproBritain’s business are still ignoring basic security fundamentals, with almost half failing to implement foundational security protections. This is according to the annual Cyber Security Breaches Survey, conducted by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to assess the security awareness and preparedness of businesses in the UK, which found that many UK companies are not following the basic security steps laid out as part of the government’s Cyber Essentials scheme.

“While it’s troubling to hear that almost half of UK businesses have experienced a cyber attack in the past year, the actual volume of these incidents is likely considerably higher,” said Gemalto’s CTO and former ethical hacker, Jason Hart. “In fact, we’ve seen from our Breach Level Index that almost as many data incidents are caused by accidental loss, as malicious outsiders.”

To read the full article click here.

 

Business Standard India – Human error is a big security issue in data breaches, says study

business-standard-logoVantage point: Insights from cutting-edge research

A staggering 3.24 million records were stolen, lost or exposed in India in 2017, which registered a 783 per cent hike from 2016, according to findings of the published by global digital security solutions provider Gemalto. Of the 29 incidents in India in 2017, identity theft accounted for 58 per cent of all data breaches. Malicious outsiders remained the number one cybersecurity threat last year, at 52 per cent of all breach incidents. in the retail, government and financial services sectors were the primary targets for breaches last year.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organisations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” says Jason Hart, vice-president and chief technology officer for data protection at Gemalto.

To read the full article click here.

The Merkle –  The Internet of (Insecure) Things: Could Blockchain Be the Solution?

themerkle-logoThe Internet of Things is taking a while to get off the ground. And with so many high-profile hacking attacks and PR disasters affecting big players like Yahoo and Jeep, it’s hardly surprising. The Internet of Things is looking a lot more like the Internet of Insecure Things, as parents watch their children’s smart dolls being hacked and patients worry about who’s controlling their cardiac devices.
“It’s clear that both consumers and businesses have serious concerns around IoT security, and little confidence that IoT service providers and device manufacturers will be able to protect IoT devices,” says Jason Hart, Chief Technology Officer at Gemalto.

To read the full article click here.

The Indian Express – Guidelines for chief information security officers

indianexpressIn its guidelines for govt CISOs, IT ministry highlights 8 best practices.

With an aim to spread awareness about the growing cyber threats to the chief information security officers (CISO) posted in every department of the government, the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology has issued best practices guidelines to ensure a safe and secure cyber environment when it comes to data stored by the government.

“In the event that the confidentiality, or privacy, of the data is breached, an organisation must have controls, such as encryption, key management and user access management, in place to ensure that integrity of the data isn’t tampered with and it can still be trusted. Regardless of any concerns around manipulation, these controls would protect the data in situ and render it useless the moment it’s stolen,” Jason Hart, vice president and chief technology officer for data protection at Gemalto.

To read the full article click here.

ITP.net – Gemalto reports 2.6bn records breached in 2017

itpOver two billion records were stolen lost or exposed in 2017, according to Gemalto’s Breach Level Index.

The Index, a global database of breaches and their severity, showed 2.6 billion records were compromised in 2017, the first time that the total has passed two billion. Identity theft comprised the majority of records lost.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organizations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” said Jason Hart, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for Data Protection at Gemalto.

“In the event that the confidentiality, or privacy, of the data is breached, an organization must have controls, such as encryption, key management and user access management, in place to ensure that integrity of the data isn’t tampered with and it can still be trusted. Regardless of any concerns around manipulation, these controls would protect the data in situ and render it useless the moment it’s stolen.”

To read the full article click here.

 

Help Net Security – 2.6 billion records were stolen, lost or exposed worldwide in 2017

helpnetGemalto released the latest findings of the Breach Level Index, revealing that 2.6 billion records were stolen, lost or exposed worldwide in 2017, an 88% increase from 2016. While data breach incidents decreased by 11%, 2017 was the first year publicly disclosed breaches surpassed more than two billion compromised data records since the Breach Level Index began tracking data breaches in 2013.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organizations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” said Jason Hart, Vice President and CTO for Data Protection at Gemalto.

To read the full article click here.

Digitalisation World – More than 2.5 billion records stolen or compromised in 2017

dw_logo2Gemalto Breach Level Index highlights improperly secured databases in the cloud and internal threats were the fastest growing security risks for companies.

Gemalto has released the latest findings of the Breach Level Index, revealing that 2.6 billion records were stolen, lost or exposed worldwide in 2017, an 88% increase from 2016. While data breach incidents decreased by 11%, 2017 was the first year publicly disclosed breaches surpassed more than two billion compromised data records since the Breach Level Index began tracking data breaches in 2013.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organisations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” said Jason Hart, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for Data Protection at Gemalto. In the event that the confidentiality, or privacy, of the data is breached, an organisation must have controls, such as encryption, key management and user access management, in place to ensure that integrity of the data isn’t tampered with and it can still be trusted. Regardless of any concerns around manipulation, these controls would protect the data in situ and render it useless the moment it’s stolen.”

To read the full article click here.

GDPR Report – More than 2.5 billion records stolen or compromised in 2017

gdprreport-logogNew findings of the Breach Level Index were released today by Gemalto, revealing that 2.6 billion records were stolen, lost or exposed worldwide in 2017, an 88% increase from 2016. While data breach incidents decreased by 11%, 2017 was the first year publicly disclosed breaches surpassed more than two billion compromised data records since the Breach Level Index began tracking data breaches in 2013.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organisations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” said Jason Hart, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for Data Protection at Gemalto. In the event that the confidentiality, or privacy, of the data is breached, an organisation must have controls, such as encryption, key management and user access management, in place to ensure that integrity of the data isn’t tampered with and it can still be trusted. Regardless of any concerns around manipulation, these controls would protect the data in situ and render it useless the moment it’s stolen.”

To read the full article click here.

IT Pro – UK data breaches decline despite sharp global rise

itproAmount of leaked data is down as organisations prepare for GDPR

Approximately 40% fewer data records were stolen or compromised in the UK in 2017 against the previous year, despite more than 2.6 billion records leaked worldwide, new findings show.

Ahead of GDPR legislation coming into force in May, the number of data breaches recorded in the UK declined from 108 in 2016 to 80 last year, according to Gemalto’s Data Breach Index 2017, released today.

Jason Hart, vice president and CTO for data protection at Gemalto, urged companies to adopt a privacy-by-design approach.

He added: “This will be especially important, considering in 2018 new government regulations like Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Australian Privacy Act (APA) go into effect. These regulations require companies to adapt a new mindset towards security, protecting not only their sensitive data but the privacy of the customer data they store or manage.”

To read the full article click here.

Information Age – Cyber security failings grow as 2.6BN records stolen or compromised in 2017

information-age-logo-text-onlyThe Gemalto Breach Level Index, released today, has revealed that improperly secured databases in the cloud and internal threats were the fastest growing security risks for companies in 2017.

“The manipulation of data or data integrity attacks pose an arguably more unknown threat for organisations to combat than simple data theft, as it can allow hackers to alter anything from sales numbers to intellectual property. By nature, data integrity breaches are often difficult to identify and in many cases, where this type of attack has occurred, we have yet to see the real impact,” said Jason Hart, vice president and chief technology officer for Data Protection at Gemalto.

To read the full article click here.