Channel Eye – Consumers will abandon insecure businesses

channeleyeCompanies that suffer from a data breach could lose more than 70 percent of their customers, according to a new survey.

Ok, the survey was carried out by Gemalto which is a security company, but it was based on questions asked to 10,000 consumers.

Gemalto Identity and Data Protection CTO Jason Hart said: “Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part.”

“In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise, businesses will face not only financial consequences but also potential legal action from consumers.”

To read the full article click here.

IT Business Edge – Holiday-Related Studies Find Customers Will Go Elsewhere When Security Fails

itbe_logoI know Black Friday and Cyber Monday are over, but the holiday shopping season is in full swing. Some interesting cybersecurity studies are out right now that I think should serve as a good reminder on why companies should be taking a hard look at their cybersecurity systems – not just during November and December, but all year round…

As Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto, said in a formal statement:

Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part. It’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option.

To read the full article click here.

 

InfoSecurity Magazine – Consumers Overwhelmingly Blame Businesses for Breaches

infosecurityAccording to a Gemalto survey of more than 10,000 consumers worldwide, only a quarter (27%) feel businesses take customer data security very seriously, and 70% would take their business elsewhere after a breach.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” said Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto. “In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start—otherwise businesses will face not only financial consequences, but also potentially legal action from consumers.”

To read the full article click here.

Credit Union Times – 70% of Consumers Would Stop Following a Business After Data Breach

credituniontimesSixty-nine percent of consumers feel businesses don’t take customer data security very seriously and 70% of them said they would stop doing business with a company following a data breach.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto, said. “In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise businesses will face not only financial consequences, but also potentially legal action from consumers.”

Hart continued, “It’s astonishing that consumers are now putting their own data at risk, by failing to use these measures, despite growing concerns around their security.” He added, the result is an alarming amount of breaches, 80%, caused by weak or previously stolen credentials. Something has to change soon on both the business and consumer sides or this is only going to get worse.”

To read the full article click here.

IT News Africa – Gemalto: Consumers will not forgive a data breach

itnewsafrica_logoOn Tuesday 28 November 2017, digital security company, Gemalto, released the results of a survey it conducted on more than 10,000 consumers worldwide. The results revealed that a majority (70%) of consumers would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach. In addition, it also revealed that seven in ten consumers (69%) feel businesses don’t take the security of customer data very seriously.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” says Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto. “In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise businesses will face not only financial consequences, but also potentially legal action from consumers.”

To read the the full article click here.

Your Story, India – Businesses still not taking data security seriously, feel Indian consumers

yourstoryDespite a rise in cyber crimes, at least six in 10 Indian consumers feel businesses don’t take the security of their data very seriously and 70 percent of them would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach, a new study said on Thursday.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto, said in a statement.

“In the face of brewing conversations around data protection and privacy law, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure,” Hart added.

To read the full article click here.

Business Standard, India – Businesses still not taking data seriously, feel Indian consumers

business-standard-logoDespite a rise in cyber crimes, at least six in 10 Indian consumers feel businesses don’t take the security of their data very seriously and 70 per cent of them would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach, a new study said on Thursday.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto, said in a statement.

“In the face of brewing conversations around data protection and privacy law, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure,” Hart added.

To read the full article click here.

The Times of India – Seven out of ten Indian consumers will stop doing business with companies if there is data breach, report says

timesofindiaCHENNAI: A majority (70%) of consumers would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach, according to a survey of more than 10,000 consumers worldwide conducted on behalf of Gemalto, a digital security company.

In addition, six in ten Indian consumers (59%) feel businesses don’t take the security of customer data very seriously.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” says Jason Hart, CTO, identity and data protection at Gemalto.

“In the face of brewing conversations around data protection and privacy law, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise businesses will face not only financial consequences, but also potentially legal action from consumers.”

To read the full article click here.

Net Ctrl – Majority of consumers would stop doing business with companies following a data breach, finds Gemalto

netctrl2A majority (70%) of consumers would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach, according to a survey of more than 10,000 consumers worldwide conducted on behalf of Gemalto, the world leader in digital security. In addition, seven in ten consumers (69%) feel businesses don’t take the security of customer data very seriously.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” says Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto. “In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise, businesses will face not only financial consequences but a potential legal action from consumers.”

To read the full article click here.

Information Age – Data breach prevention is essential to consumer retention

information-age-logo-text-onlyA majority (70%) of consumers would stop doing business with a company if it experienced a data breach, according to a survey of more than 10,000 consumers worldwide conducted on behalf of Gemalto, the digital security compay. In addition, seven in ten consumers (69%) feel businesses don’t take the security of customer data very seriously.

“Consumers are evidently happy to relinquish the responsibility of protecting their data to a business, but are expecting it to be kept secure without any effort on their part,” says Jason Hart, CTO, Identity and Data Protection at Gemalto.

“In the face of upcoming data regulations such as GDPR, it’s now up to businesses to ensure they are forcing security protocols on their customers to keep data secure. It’s no longer enough to offer these solutions as an option. These protocols must be mandatory from the start – otherwise businesses will face not only financial consequences, but also potentially legal action from consumers.”

To read the full article click here.